The Hillbilly African

Minimalism, Eco-friendliness, Motherhood

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s

I was cloth diapered, and I always knew that if I had a kid I would cloth diaper too. I wanted to do it because of how much cheaper it was, but also because of how better for the environment it was. Disposable diaper waste accounts for 30% of our landfill waste and as I attempt to minimize my carbon footprint I knew that this was one way I could do my part.

Read more about just how crappy *lol* disposable diapers are here.

Now that I have been cloth diapering for 18 months, I feel like a pro who has been through it all. I have tried all the decently priced cloth diapering systems (pockets, covers, AIO’s),dealt with diaper rash, and figured out our perfect wash routine. I have a system now that works great for us and thought this might save anyone looking to get into cloth diapering the trouble.

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The cheapest and most eco friendly option for cloth that worked out for my family is using a diaper cover and  inserts. Inserts can be anything from an old cotton tshirt, receiving blankets, flour sack towel, or pre-fold inserts that many cloth diaper company’s sell. These inserts can be cheaply bought new, made, or purchased second hand.

Covers

The waterproof layer of the diaper that traps the waste is known as a cover. They come in a few different styles with limitless prints. The great thing about covers is that unless they get any poop on them, they can be used for multiple diaper changes since the only thing that you change out is the diaper insert. My favorite cover style is the very affordable happy flute diaper cover (butterfly diaper pictured below). My friend Alyson (another WOC mama blogger) sent me the cover and I have loved it ever since.

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s My Cloth Diapering MVP’s

Prefolds

We use medium and large pre-folds on Thandiwe. A little bit on the bulkier side but very absorbent. All mine we either hand me downs from friends or purchased second hand

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s

A note about second hand cloth diapers, always give them a simple bleach soak to clean them before using them on your kid. 

Inserts

Available in many blends, from cotton, to hemp, bamboo, and much more, inserts are a trim, buildable and easy way to add absorbency to diapers. My favorites are the alva bamboo inserts pictured below.

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s

Flour sack towels and Receiving Blankets

My favorite and the cheapest way to cloth diaper by far. Receiving blankets are incredibly absorbent and we had several to spare from Thandiwe’s infancy. FST’s are also great. A 4-pack typically costs anywhere from $3-4 and they work great. They are simply folded into a long rectangle and used a prefold or insert would in the diaper.

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s My Cloth Diapering MVP’s

Poop and Pee

A common question: Breastfeed poop is water soluble and can go straight into the wash with other diapers.  Formula fed and food eating baby’s poop should be rinsed off into the toilet and toddler solid poop can simply be tossed into the toilet. We store her diapers in a sealable wet bag next to her changing table and wash her diapers 1-2 times a week.

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s
Happy flute cover stuffed with receiving blanket and charcoal bamboo insert for extra absorbency

My Cloth Diapering MVP’s

Washing routine

Each machine is different . I suggest visiting Fluff Love University to figure out a system that works for your machine as well as picking out a good detergent to clean the diapers with.

Peace, Love, and fluffy butts.